Magazine ABCs round-up

The magazine industry showed signs of recovery in the first six months of 2010 – in some areas. In others, familiar trends continued. But overall, there was enough to suggest print won’t be surrendering to the digital age just yet.

Bauer Consumer Media

Total average circulation per issue: 2,814,745

January to June 2010: Down 4.7 per cent

Year-on-year: Down 5.8 per cent

Reasons to be cheerful: Kerrang! hit a high note with a seven per cent six-monthly increase, reaching 44,013 issues a week on average. Fashion mag Grazia held steady during a tough year, while Top Sante and Yours showed signs of recovery over the last six months, up 4.2 per cent and 4.5 per cent period on period respectively.

Reasons to be fearful: Another 16.7 per cent of FHM’s readership ebbed away between January and June, and Zoo plunged 21.6 per cent over the same period.

BBC Magazines

Total average circulation per issue: 2,952,806

January to June 2010: Down 0.5 per cent

Year-on-year: Up 3.1 per cent

Reasons to be cheerful: Lonely Planet Magazine recorded a whopping a 21.4 per cent rise between January and June. BBC Countryfile found its feet to climb 21.6 per cent period-on-period, while BBC History was up 8.4 per cent year-on-year.

Reasons to be fearful: Flagship title Top Gear dipped 5.2 per cent both period-on-period and year on year to 190,375 copies. Things went sour for Good Food and Easy Cook, down 13.0 and 13.4 per cent period-on-period respectively. A double-digit period-on-period fall for Charlie & Lola, Waybuloo and In the Night Garden, blighted the Children’s sector.

Condé Nast

Total average circulation per issue: 1,539,661

January to June 2010: Up 0.8 per cent

Year-on-year: Up 2.8 per cent

Reasons to be cheerful: Glamour has retained the number one spot in the women’s lifestyle division with a 2.1 per cent rise over the past six months, while Tatler edged up 1.6 per cent year-on-year to 86,448 copies.

Reasons to be fearful: Though all its magazines either held firm at worst, the publisher employed a widespread discounting subscriptions policy.

Dennis Publishing

Total average circulation per issue: 437,519

January to June 2010: 1.2 per cent

Year-on-year: 1.5 per cent

Reasons to be cheerful: The Week posted its 24th consecutive to rise to 176,680 copies, a 4.1 per cent advance over the last six months. Motoring magazines Octane and Evo climbed 9.9 per cent and 3.2 per cent respectively year-on-year.

Reasons to be fearful: Weekly title Auto Express went into reverse by 3.3 per cent in the first half of 2010 and 9.9 per cent year-on-year.

Haymarket Consumer Media

Total average circulation per issue: 385,346

January to June 2010: Down 4.3 per cent

Year-on-year: Down 0.9 per cent

Reasons to be cheerful: Haymarket’s flagship car mags What Car? and Autocar, posted period-on-period increases of 1.6 per cent and 0.6 per cent respectively.

Reasons to be fearful: Four Four Two saw circulation slip 7.9 per cent, possibly in part because of an underwhelming World Cup, in the last six months, while men’s lifestyle title Stuff sunk 10.8 per cent over the same period.

H Bauer

Total average circulation per issue: 3,052,641

January to June 2010: Down 3.1 per cent

Year-on-year: Down 4.6 per cent

Reasons to be cheerful: TV Choice – the only H Bauer title to increase its circulation over the last six months – crept up 0.5 per cent to 1,309,469 copies and remained the UK’s biggest-selling paid-for magazine.

Reasons to be fearful: Eat In, which launched in March 2009, is struggling to take a significant bite out of a crowded market. The title dropped 14.3 per cent between January and June to just 19,009 copies – drastically lower than its launch print-run of 120,000. Inauspiciously, TV Quick was scrapped by H Bauer in May.

Hachette Filipacchi

Total average circulation per issue: 992,177

January to June 2010: Down 3.4 per cent

Year-on-year: Down 3.9 per cent

Reasons to be cheerful: Affluent women’s monthly Red, which has posted a record circulation of 230,067, grew 5.2 per cent year-on-year. Meanwhile, entertainment website Digital increased its monthly uniques to almost eight million, while Elleuk.com is the sixth-biggest magazine brand on Twitter, with an legion of 120,000 followers.

Reasons to be fearful: Psychologies mag is feeling the strain with a 9.0 per cent depression to 119,025 in the first six months of 2010. Teen magazine Sugar also fell 19.4 per cent in the same period.

IPC Media

Total average circulation per issue: 5,738,111

January to June 2010: Down 2.6 per cent

Year-on-year: Down 3.3 per cent

Reasons to be cheerful: Every title in the homes portfolio sector was up between January and June year-on-year. Elsewhere women’s lifestyle titles performed well, with Essentials up 12.9 per cent year-on-year and Woman & Home climbing 5.5 per cent in the same period.

Reasons to be fearful: IPC’s men’s mags continued to suffer, with Loaded falling 24.8 per cent period-on-period and 26.3 per cent year-on-year to 53,592 copies. Nuts sank by 16.8 per cent over the last six months, but is having some success online.

NatMag

Total average circulation per issue: 3,050,689

January to June 2010: Down 1.6 per cent

Year-on-year: Up 1.4 per cent

Reasons to be cheerful: Harper’s Bazaar rose 7.2 per cent over the last 12 months to post a record circulation of 118,553, while Real People lifted sales 11.5 per cent in the same period to 225,145. Coast and Country Living also recorded their best totals to date.

Reasons to be fearful: Cosmopolitan lost 6.6 per cent of its circulation over the past six months and She mag dropped 3.9 per cent period-on-period and 3.1 per cent year-on-year.

ShortList Media

Total average circulation per issue: 518,222 copies of ShortList and 421,158 copies of Stylist each week.

Reasons to be cheerful: ShortList’s distribution is up 1.0 per cent period on period, and Stylist climbed 3.0 per cent between January and June – already 5.0 per cent ahead of its launch guarantee of 400,000 copies.

Reasons to be fearful: Barring a massive retrenchment in ad income, both the publisher’s “freemium” magazines look to be going from strength to strength.

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“Before we all sink into a slough of digital dystopian despair, it might be worth considering this: is this a sign of the strength, not weakness, of revelatory journalism in the digital age?”


Charlie Beckett, director of POLIS at the London School of Economics, reacts to news that the UK government forced the Guardian into destroying hard drives that contained information leaked by Edward Snowden.


(Source: POLIS)

 

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